FindChaos: The Official Blog of A. Stiffler

Professional illustrator, comic artist, graphic designer and avid birder. Stuff I draw and other nonsense.
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Asker Anonymous Asks:
I was thinking of ordering some absinthe online from Germany. Do you have any recommendations? My knowledge is limited, and reading reviews is kinda daunting when there's so many options.
findchaos findchaos Said:

Definitely!

If you’re trying absinthe for the first time or just want a very traditional experience, I would highly recommend either:

Both feature old fashioned flavor notes based on original absinthe recipes, so if you want to taste the same drink of Victorian fame, definitely start there.

Otherwise, the absinthe we just mentioned — Adnams Copper House Absinthe Rouge — is another good choice, especially if you’re adverse to any herbal bitterness. It has the flavor of traditional absinthe, but the herbaceous notes are tempered by hibiscus.

As a general rule, avoid American brands (which lack the potency), and any pop culture-style brands (I’m lookin’ at you, Nemesinthe). They might not be terrible across the board, but my experience has found most of them disappointing or downright foul.

On that note, you can also find alternate labels that downplay or do away with the anise flavors completely, which, I mean, if that’s your preference, more power to you, but you might as well not be drinking absinthe, in my opinion. Do give traditional flavors a try, maybe even two or three tries. I hated anise (and liquorice-flavored candies) with a burning passion before I had absinthe. It was only after trying it and appreciating the flavor mixed with an herbal bouquet that I found a love for it.

Good luck finding your favorite!

Adnams Copper House Absinthe Rouge

Jiji observed as we tested a rouge absinthe (with no sugar, thanks). The flavor is very traditional, smooth, and has a distinctive natural sweetness without being cloying, thanks in part to the anise oils and hibiscus. The louche is a satisfyingly milky color with just a hint of pink.

findchaos:

FindChaos: Unkindness, Page 46

Another casualty of the evening.

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In case you missed the update!

FindChaos: Unkindness, Page 46

Another casualty of the evening.

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It’s been a year now, but this still has to be my favorite video of Konstantin. Between his cartoonish face and fortuitous music line-ups, it’s just pure oxytocin-laden nostalgia to me.

whowasntthere:

Sneak Preview - Buttons!

I’ve been hard at work making us another little shop this month, which includes some custom Agender pins I might have already ordered for Stiffler. Their pronouns aren’t “preferred,” any more than their name is — those are just their g’damn pronouns. Anyway, available so soooooon!!

I am unreasonably excited to release these.

The Birds of America by John James Audubon (3rd ed., 1942)

Let’s just say, K knows the way to my heart. Photographic evidence, with particular care to include the flamingo, K’s favorite bird.

whowasntthere:

Sometimes (so often) on Tumblr, I just want to respond with a Form Letter to my personal Asks. It would read vaguely like: 

I Have Received Your Ask. Unfortunately, it seems that you lack (one or more of) the following:

  • Reading Comprehension
  • Knowing That Mythical Creatures Aren’t Real
  • Understanding Hyperbole
  • Knowing Anything About Me
  • Being Capable of Basic Reasoning
  • The “Google” Search Bar
  • Any Sense of Boundaries
  • A Desire for Reasonable Discourse Beyond Inflammatory Verbal Diarrhea
  • Discriminatory Words Against Me Beyond “Dyke,” “Bitch,” “Lesbo,” “Rape-Baby,” or variations of “Fuck(er)” 
  • A Dictionary  

Because of this, I have chosen to laugh, delete your Ask and never think of you again. Please continue being one of God’s humorous creatures, much like the duck-billed platypus. Or, in lieu of this, use the amazingly wondrous internet you got here with to educate and entertain yourself instead, much unlike the duck-billed platypus (unless there’s some secret world of Cybernet DBP we’re unaware of, in which case, good on them). Please proceed to the nearest exit and Don’t Panic. 

Playtime Had: ALL OF IT.

Asker Anonymous Asks:
A followup to your last ask. Do you think being agender is caused by genetics, or because you were allowed the freedom growing up to pick your own identity? As a cis white male, I'm curious if most people who fall into a different spectrum of gender do so because of nature or nurture. I mean at this point most scientists are pretty sure sexual orientation is caused by genetics.. but is gender genetics or just societal pressure? (Sorry this went so long)
findchaos findchaos Said:

(In context of this Ask.)

You see, that’s where it all gets really interesting: “gender” itself is a construct centered around the most common genetic commonalities and the roles various societies impose on those resulting sexes. While I could ramble on for an entire book on the various roles different cultures create surrounding the sexes, how they can contradict one another, and even point out that many cultures, especially ancient ones, feature varying concepts of a third gender, I’d actually like to focus on the root cause of everyone’s confusion: biological sex.

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While it’s true that most cultures agree that there are “men” and “women,” and construct little gender boxes around those two, humans are actually far more exciting and complicated than that. Your genitals are only one, not entirely accurate, factor into deciding what you “are.” Chromosomes and hormones actually play a much bigger role into determining what sex you are, and even that’s kind of purple-colored territory that doesn’t fit into strictly pink and blue zones.

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In fact, between 1-2% of the human population is intersex, which just scratches the surface of genetic variations a person could contain. The World Health Organization actually has quite a lot to say on the matter. And if we can accept that literally millions of people don’t fit into even the most rigorous of determining factors for sex, then I don’t think it’s really that radical to think our flimsy gender constructs don’t tell the whole story, either.

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Essentially, I think that it could be argued on a case-by-case basis whether nature or nurture was the most important factor in one’s gender identity, because the whole concept is subject to too many variations. And now that the determining factors for biological sex have been proven to be so varied, it hardly seems worth factoring into an individual’s gender identity either, no more than why they have green eyes instead of brown.

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TL;DR: Using biology as a factor in determining one’s gender identity is an outdated concept perpetuated by old societal traditions.

How did you come to realise you were agender? Because I've been thinking I might be (well maybe 'my brain keeps sucker punching my sense of myself as cis' is more accurate)
findchaos findchaos Said:

When I really think about it, it wasn’t so much realizing that I could be agender so much as realizing that the word “agender,” upon discovering it, described everything I already felt, if that makes any sense. 

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For my entire life, I’ve straddled the gender lines. I was a little girl who wanted gold high heels for Christmas and dressed like I was going to high court, yet I brawled with the boys during recess. I cut my hair short as soon as my age hit double digits, but painted my bedroom bright pink. I didn’t think twice about choosing to live as a boy named Alex for several years, and not a single member of my family seemed to think that was out of character. Even though I sang soprano in choir, my natural speaking voice was deeper and more gruff than most of the boys I went to school with.

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I was just “me.” I felt a little weird when people referred to me as a girl, yet being labeled a boy just didn’t feel right, either. Yet, I was in the fortunate position of growing up in a diverse neighborhood with a very liberal family, so I didn’t have to push myself into any boxes before I was ready. I honestly just didn’t think about my gender for years.

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It wasn’t until I read about the concept of “agender” a few years ago that I had an “aha” moment. It essentially described how I felt and how I had been living my life; it was the first time I had ever heard a person described that sounded like me.

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The funny thing is: I think a lot more people fit into that term than they realize, because “agender” is essentially saying "my gender isn’t important to me, (but my lack of gender kind of is.*)" Obviously, we need better marketing. But like my upbringing, I want everyone to have the chance to suss out their own identities. There’s a huge myriad of ways to be human, after all.

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*(optional clause)